RoboCup Junior Rescue

Artificial intelligence at its best! The Rescue competition mirrors the real life use of robots that rescue people from life-threatening situations.


Primary Rescue is designed for primary aged students.
Robots compete by following a winding line on a series of tiles to a designated rescue area. On the way the robot could encounter obstacles, bridges and short cut opportunities that will challenge the most intrepid programmer. After negotiating the randomly selected path, the robot arrives at a green coloured area which indicates a chemical spill. While the clock is still ticking the robot must find "the victim" before pushing them out of the quicksand to safety.

Secondary Rescue suits Secondary aged students.
Robots compete on the same field as the Primary Rescue and play under the same rules, however, when Secondary Resuce teams reach the chemical spill they need to find "the victim" and control it (contain or lift) and then manouver it out of the chemical spill. Finally they need to save the robot and exit the chemical spill from where they entered.

Open Rescue is suitable for experienced primary and secondary students.
Robots use the same tiles as Primary/Secondary Rescue, however, this time the robots can encounter some extra tiles including the challenging "gridlock". Once in the chemical spill, the Open Rescue robot is required to find and lift the victim out to the safety of a raised platform. Finally they need to save the robot and exit the chemical spill from where they entered. A true test of a robot designers ability!

In 2007 we introduced a new rescue challenge. The rescue field is now based on a modular 594mm square tile which we can use to make an endless number of different coures for your robots to traverse and also provides us with the ability to add new tiles in the future. We are also introducing a 3rd dimension to the course with bridges, speed bumps and obstacles. In 2013 the introduction of blocks to raise the tiles themselves allow courses with tunnels. The introduction of a "Drop Zone" in 2014 will add a new degree of strategy for teams to consider. In 2015, Secondar and Open Rescue have the possibility of an Extended Rescue Area consisting of multiple Rescue Tiles and Open Rescue may need to contend with more than one Rescue Capsule and needing to work out which one to rescue? In 2016 the tiles can now be as small as 300 x 300 and any shape, with the course of the lines set by specified dimensions.


Rescue Maze will be a demonstration challenge in 2016. It will use the RoboCup Junior Rescue Maze International rules (see below). Teams will be able to participate in Rescue Maze as an additional challenge in 2016 only.
The Rescue Maze challenge is open to all RoboCup Junior age groups.
A disaster has occurred and it is too dangerous for human to enter. A Rescue mission is necessary. A fully autonomous robot needs to be sent into the hazardous maze to locate heated victims so that the humans know where they are. A rescue package needs to be dropped for the humans that will locate them and keep them alive, 'water' etc (note: simulated).


Journals, Logbooks for Rescue events

To enable teams to organise the development of the Rescue challenge solution a journal is recomended for teams and required for National Competitions.
A good template to use in on our ACARA page Challenge Journal/Logbook


Inspirational videos to show why Rescue is so important

These Robots come to the Rescue after a disaster - Robyn Murphy

A robot that runs and swims like a salamander - Auke Ijspeert

Robots inspired by cockroach ingenuity - Robert Full

Victoria will be using a modified set of rules for their Rescue competitions which can be viewed at the links below.

These rules are not applicable to the national competition or competitions in other States or Territories. If you cannot access the links below, try here.


Download the Rules: